SN.47.5. Akusalarāsisutta ("A Heap of the Unskillful")

Saṁyutta Nikāya ("The Linked Discourses")

At Sāvatthī.

There the Buddha said:

“Rightly speaking, mendicants, you’d call these five hindrances a ‘heap of the unskillful’. For these five hindrances are entirely a heap of the unskillful. What five? The hindrances of sensual desire, ill will, dullness and drowsiness, restlessness and remorse, and doubt. Rightly speaking, you’d call these five hindrances a ‘heap of the unskillful’. For these five hindrances are entirely a heap of the unskillful.

Rightly speaking, you’d call these four kinds of mindfulness meditation a ‘heap of the skillful’. For these four kinds of mindfulness meditation are entirely a heap of the skillful. What four? It’s when a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body—keen, aware, and mindful, rid of desire and aversion for the world. They meditate observing an aspect of feelings … They meditate observing an aspect of the mind … They meditate observing an aspect of principles—keen, aware, and mindful, rid of desire and aversion for the world. Rightly speaking, you’d call these four kinds of mindfulness meditation a ‘heap of the skillful’. For these four kinds of mindfulness meditation are entirely a heap of the skillful.”

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